Weather charts from the UK Met Office.

This page shows up to date weather charts information compiled from the actual weather charts from the UK Met Office. With this page we supply information to our captains and crews and any other sailor in need of actual weather information.  During our yacht delivery, yacht management and crewing operations it is a comforting thought to have weather information available at a well known place.

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ANALYSIS FORECAST T+24 FORECAST T+36

 

FORECAST T+48 FORECAST T+60 FORECAST T+72

 

FORECAST T+84 FORECAST T+96 FORECAST T+108

The weather environment

Many variables make the weather. Air temperature, pressure, humidity and wind speed all vary with height and interact with each other in the atmosphere. In the ocean, sea temperature, salinity and water movement affect a parallel system, interacting with the atmosphere. On land, temperatures, reflectivity, thermal mass and topography add a further dimension to the motive forces acting on the weather. All of these properties work together within systems that might span a region from a small bay to the whole world. They fluctuate in natural system cycles of a few hours to hundreds, and even thousands of years. Random events overlay natural cycles, and can affect initial conditions with fair reaching consequences.

Global forecast models rely on computers that replicate real weather cells. Each cell receives influences from adjoining cells, such as temperature and pressure variations. A set of initial conditions is introduced, and this mini world creates its own winds and storms. The effect of one cell on the next is actually based on relatively simple equations. Powerfull computers are only required because the world is large, and each cell affects six adjacent cells, so many calculations need to be made. But the principles are simple, and we can use them to understand the weather.